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Re: Stress relief

Reply #105

Quote from: Spuds – Can't get out this fall (yet, maybe, wishing)  ... so shop time is my stress relief   :smiley:
Wow, that's impressive. You have everything a woodworker needs, including a big room. I'm jealous.  :smiley:
I  also have this passion, but it's only a passion since I don't have such a big place and all the tools you have.  I see some nice joints on the table you are building. My results are pretty disappointing,  as you know a circular saw is not as precise as a table saw, a hand planner is limited if compared to a thickness planner, and so on...
sorry for my bad english

Re: Stress relief

Reply #106

Thanks  :smiley:

Been collecting / changing / trading tools for many years, I'd say 1/2+ of what you see were purchased used, some were free.  There are some great deals out there, just have to be patient, and be willing to fix things.  I've fixed many broken / worn out tools, but that to me is part of the hobby, its amazing what people would simply scrap when all it needs is new bearings/bushings and a little time.

That table is a prototype, as I figure out a several  details and make some templates for reuse.  Its just pine wood, but its all mortise and tenon joinery with dowel pins to pull it tight.   The final one will be out of maple, and the prototype will be donated.

Re: Stress relief

Reply #107

Quote from: Spuds – I do like how you store your propane tank next to the wood stove  :tongue:

Yea, the woodstove was basically useless, It mostly just sucks what warm air is in the garage and sends it out through the roof, drawing cold air in under the garage doors.  But if I took it out I've have to fix the hole in the roof, so I've been putting it off until I have to reroof the garage (which was at that point about 10 years ago, but I can't seem to find the round tuit..)  It seemed a good place for the propane heater though.. :wink:

// Deep inside every dilemma lies a solution that involves explosives //

Re: Stress relief

Reply #108

Quote from: Spuds – .
.

That table is a prototype, as I figure out a several  details and make some templates for reuse.  Its just pine wood, but its all mortise and tenon joinery with dowel pins to pull it tight.   The final one will be out of maple, and the prototype will be donated.

I know the perfect place for it... can I specify the stain?  :cheesy:

// Deep inside every dilemma lies a solution that involves explosives //


Re: Stress relief

Reply #110

Beautiful !

Here leaf's are still coming down with every breeze, looks like that area is a couple of weeks ahead of me.  It was a spectacular fall this year.

Re: Stress relief

Reply #111

I just put the cover on the pool for the season, have to wait until March to reopen.  :cry: 

Re: Stress relief

Reply #112

Quote from: radu81 – as you know a circular saw is not as precise as a table saw,
I solved this, I found a good offer for a new DeWalt DW7485-qs and I couldn' resist. Next step is to build a stable table saw.  :wink:
sorry for my bad english

Re: Stress relief

Reply #113

20230624_212327.jpg

Re: Stress relief

Reply #114

I trust that you refer to kicking back and burning the 2x4 scrap after completing the construction project..   :smiley:

But if that's cedar, I could have used that.. :thinking:

// Deep inside every dilemma lies a solution that involves explosives //

Re: Stress relief

Reply #115

Quote from: Steeley – I trust that you refer to kicking back and burning the 2x4 scrap after completing the construction project..  :smiley:

But if that's cedar, I could have used that.. :thinking:
Not exactly. Good eye on the two by. 


I was camping in the Uwharrie National Forest. Importing firewood from other locales is a big no-no, as you're likely aware. You can buy locally cut wood. Usually it's about $7 or $8 for a handful of matchsticks. The two bys were an experiment: less than $3 for a two by, kiln dried (so no pest transfer concerns, and no grief from a ranger), easy lighting, easy storage, cost effective in relative terms, and readily available. They burned longer than I imagined too. I'll call it a win! 

 

Re: Stress relief

Reply #116

Quote from: badmonkey –
Quote from: Steeley – I trust that you refer to kicking back and burning the 2x4 scrap after completing the construction project..  :smiley:

But if that's cedar, I could have used that.. :thinking:
Not exactly. Good eye on the two by.

I was camping in the Uwharrie National Forest. Importing firewood from other locales is a big no-no, as you're likely aware. You can buy locally cut wood. Usually it's about $7 or $8 for a handful of matchsticks. The two bys were an experiment: less than $3 for a two by, kiln dried (so no pest transfer concerns, and no grief from a ranger), easy lighting, easy storage, cost effective in relative terms, and readily available. They burned longer than I imagined too. I'll call it a win!

Well, I've had 2x's on my mind for awhile lately..   for background, we have to go back about 22 years .....

My house was built in 1973, and I bought it in 1989.. the driveway transverses across the front of the house to the garage (from this view, the garage is behind you to your right), which compelled the builder to construct the front porch thusly..  crappy design - the steps were too long for one normal step, and too short for two normal steps.. and no covering from above... sheesh.

2002.jpg

By 2002, being rained on for nigh on 30 years, that front porch was pretty sad - constructed of redwood, I decided it was definitely unsafe and had to be replaced (the wood was so far gone I tore chunks of it out with my bare hands). Now, because it was a "repair" I didn't need to pull a building permit.. (but nothing says I can't improve things a little bit, right? ..)  :undecided:

So in 2003 I designed and built a new porch and steps out of cedar, make it a little fancier too, ya know... and of course, needed to extend the roof line 5' to protect it.. the "California Gutters" (a 2x8 nailed to the end of the 2x6 rafters creating a channel sealed with some faux rubber crap), may be acceptable in Desert Hot Springs, but not here in the Pacific Northwet..) :persevere:   That too just HAD to go..  All part of the "repair", you see...

2002-1.jpg   2002-2.jpg

Well, after another 20 years I came to realize I really should have extended the roof a bit further, since the lower steps were still being rained on and were starting to rot out too (gotta look past my motorcycles to see what I mean..)

2022.JPG


And if you notice, every one of those steps are composed of 3 cedar boards of custom cut size and shape..  no two are alike.

So I ripped the lower steps out, beefed up the understructure (originally done with treated lumber) and commenced to replace the steps with new cedar boards, this time varnished with several coats of 'Innovative' Wood Guard "no slip" coating.  So yea - I'm tuned into 2x4's and 2x6's lately.

I also took my belt sander to a couple of boards I'm not going to replace, to verify the underlying wood was still close to the "new" color with all the dirt sanded off (which it is), so when I get all the steps I'm going to replace in place, I'll sand the rest of the steps down and seal them with the same wood guard. 

2023.jpg

However, the project is going slower than planned because when the weather is this nice, I wanna go RIDE!  :cool:

(But when it's all done, I'll too vanquish some stress by burning the scrap..)



 
 
 
Last Edit: June 26, 2023, 02:31:56 pm by Steeley

// Deep inside every dilemma lies a solution that involves explosives //

Re: Stress relief

Reply #117

Quote from: radu81 –
Quote from: radu81 – as you know a circular saw is not as precise as a table saw,
I solved this, I found a good offer for a new DeWalt DW7485-qs and I couldn' resist. Next step is to build a stable table saw.  :wink:


Those are nice saws...  but you don't have to get too fancy @radu81

I came across a metal stand at a garage sale some 35 years ago.. that, bolting a piece of plywood to it and and a couple c-clamps to hold the table saw firm works just fine..  I don't think I've got $50 in all of it (including the saw), and I've built decks, sheds, platforms, the porch, workshop in the garage, you name it with that dude. Add a Black and Decker Workmate (WM225-A) or similar to extend the platform for long lumber .. and it all breaks down in minutes and can get easily hauled and set up where ever you need to work..

IMG_0023.jpg

If you've already worked up your own mount now, post up a picture.. I like to see what others have done .. innovations, etc..
Last Edit: June 26, 2023, 02:44:45 pm by Steeley

// Deep inside every dilemma lies a solution that involves explosives //

Re: Stress relief

Reply #118

Well... Yes I bought a DeWalt table saw and it was an an affair at that time, on amazon and other sites the price was something like 600-700e, even near to 800€, now it's "only" 540€. I paid it less than 400€ (320€ + 20€ shippings IIRC), new item without  warranty, don't ask me why and and how come it was possible... I don't know, I found a 5 minutes old auction published at 01:00 AM, I made an offer, and at 8 AM the seller asked me if I want to cancel my offer since he got other 20 other requests :) An used item on ebay was sold for 480€ + shippings a day before....
Anyway I don't have any fancy project to show for now since I only use it for rough works, there are 3 years since I try to finish to renovate my new house,  probably this year I'll do it, but I guess it's better to stop saying this, there are 3 years since the first time I said "I'll be in for Christmas" :( :( I did a lot of work by myself, but trust me, to renovate a 60 years old house it's not an easy task in Italy. If I could turn back time I would consider a complete demolition and rebuild....
I did consider other cheap alternatives, at that time the cheapest table saw was something like 250€ and trust me, it's impossible to make a perfect 90° cut on those table saws.  I've spent 5-10 minutes on the Dewalt table saw before making my first cut, and after that everything was ready to glue up...
Last Edit: June 26, 2023, 05:32:30 pm by radu81
sorry for my bad english

Re: Stress relief

Reply #119

Well, if you're doing "cabinetry" type work, yea, you do need a "really-good saw[TM]" and a set up something like Spuds has..  I'm more of a framer, I don't insult 'carpenters' by claiming to be one. I've been complimented on my design and engineering, but never on my finish work. (And it's not because of my tools - I typically measure 3 times, cut once,  call it "practice", toss it in the scrap pile, and try again..)   :rolleyes:

I have to ask if you're married, and if so, if your wife is also Italian..  mine is, and there's no way she'd cut me slack for 3 years on a home remodel without making my life miserable...
:stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes: 

Edit: Don't know what you can find over in the EU, but I did find my table saw stand (or something really close), available cheap here in the US on Ebay  - apparently Sears/Craftsman made bunches of these if you're interested. At least you know what to look around for..  I think I paid like $5 for mine long ago..
Last Edit: June 27, 2023, 12:41:33 am by Steeley

// Deep inside every dilemma lies a solution that involves explosives //